MICL
menu MENU
Home > News > All News > Chip Design & Architectures

Chip Design & Architectures

News Feed

Hardware model checker takes gold at international competition

The system automatically proves the trustworthiness of a hardware design, outperforming the competition in nearly every category.

ADA Center holds 2020 symposium with virtual attendance, highlighting new research into computer design

The symposium highlighted new developments in computer architecture, and included a session on how the center's research can contribute to limiting the impact of pandemics.

Analytical model predicts exactly how much a piece of hardware will speed up data centers

The analytical model, called Accelerometer, can be applied in the early stages of an accelerator’s design to predict its effectiveness before ever being installed.

Todd Austin Named S. Jack Hu Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Prof. Austin is a creative, outside-the-box thinker who has produced a body of work that has had extraordinary impact in the area of computer architecture.

Das recognized as outstanding researcher for work on computational caches

Computational caches are an emerging technology based on the use of a processors cache space to perform computations.

Hun-Seok Kim receives CAREER Award to facilitate Internet of Things connectivity

Kim takes an interdisciplinary approach to tackle challenges in heterogeneous classes of energy-efficient and versatile communication systems.

Top students recognized in EECS 583 Optimization Contest

Five students take compiler optimizations to a new level with speculative loop optimization

New student tool gets chips from lab to fab faster than ever

The open-source system cuts a key step in chip testing down from days or weeks to a couple hours, on average.

Beyond Moore’s Law: taking transistor arrays into the third dimension

Thin film transistors stacked on top of a state-of-the-art silicon chip could help shrink electronics while improving performance.

25-year paper award for power-saving approach to high-performance computing

Mudge’s paper examined the power-saving needs of high-performance computing.

NDSEG Fellowship for overcoming Moore’s Law with innovative architecture

Eckert is working to expand the role of memory and give it a dual responsibility to both store and compute data.

New chip stops hacks before they start

MORPHEUS can encrypt and reshuffle code thousands of times faster than human and electronic hackers.

Crafting better digital systems with ECE PhD student Jie-Fang Zhang

Zhang is recognized with the Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship for his work designing hardware solutions that could help support computer vision and machine learning.

Student earns Microsoft Fellowship for research in a new computing paradigm

Kassa is developing a framework that will look at the computations of an application and decide in real time which components will best handle it

Bridging the “last centimeter barrier” in electronic communications

Michigan Engineering researchers led by Prof. Pinaki Mazumder have created a new chip interconnect technology using terahertz surface-wave interconnects that will enable ultra fast data transmissions.

Taking on the limits of computing power

By harnessing the power and speed of graphics processing units, a University of Michigan startup can dramatically accelerate gene sequencing, shortening tasks that took multiple days to a single hour.

Understanding at every level

From quantum physics to computer systems: a profile of Pinaki Mazumder, professor of electrical engineering and computer science.

Faster, cheaper gene sequencing to make healthcare more precise

Genome sequencing could be as affordable as a routine medical test with highly efficient computing.

Beyond Moore’s law: $16.7M for advanced computing projects

DARPA’s initiative to reinvigorate the microelectronics industry draws deeply on Michigan Engineering expertise.

Using software to beat Moore’s Law: $9.5M to design the ‘reconfigurable computer’

Transmuter can change how programs use the hardware available to them in real time, effectively acting as a reconfigurable computer.

CSE researchers win Best of SELSE award

Three researchers with Michigan CSE affiliations have won the the best paper award at the 14th Workshop on Silicon Errors in Logic – System Effects (SELSE).

New computing system to enable deep space missions

A new radiation-hardened, multi-processor, Arm-based spacecraft processor is being developed at Michigan in a project led by Boeing and funded by NASA.

Unhackable computer under development with $3.6M DARPA grant

The researchers say they’re making an unsolvable puzzle: ‘It’s like if you’re solving a Rubik’s Cube and every time you blink, I rearrange it.’

Michigan researchers win best paper award at DFT 2017

Prof. John Hayes and CSE graduate student Paishun Ting received the award for their paper entitled “Eliminating a Hidden Error Source in Stochastic Circuits.”

BugMD: automatic mismatch diagnosis for bug triaging

Bugs that are not caught before a product is released can cost companies billions of dollars.

Next-gen computing inspired by biology

New memristor chips can see patterns over pixels.

2017 ISCA Influential Paper Award for groundbreaking research in power-efficient computing

This award recognizes the paper published 15 years ago (2002) that has had the biggest impact on the field

Reetuparna Das receives NSF CAREER Award to develop in-situ compute memories

Das’ research seeks to design specialized data-centric computing systems that dramatically reduce time and energy required to move data from storage to computing units.

David Chesney awarded funding to research treatment for traumatic brain injury

This device could not only be useful in the ICU or field hospital setting, but also during long military patient transport, and especially in situations in which limited personnel and resources are available.

Injectable computers can broadcast from inside the body

This platform has enabled a variety of sensors that can fit inside the human body, made possible by several breakthroughs in ultra-low power computing.

Injectable computers

With a radio specifically designed to communicate through tissue, researchers from the Electrical and Computer Engineering are adding another level to a computer platform small enough to fit inside a medical grade syringe.

Making Memory Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger

Prof. Wei Lu and former student Dr. Sung Hyun Jo co-founded Crossbar, Inc. to tackle the physical limitations of conventional memory technology.

MBus is the missing interconnect for millimeter-scale systems

The M3 is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system.

Design Automation Conference Technical Program Committee Holds Meeting in Detroit

Prof. Valeria Bertacco, Technical Program Chair for the 2017 conference, chose Michigan as the meeting location.

$3.46M to Combine Machine Learning on Big Data with Physical Simulations

The focal point of the project will be a new computing resource, called ConFlux, which is designed to enable supercomputer simulations to interface with large datasets while running.

Meet Sirius: An Open-Source Digital Assistant

Sirius as an important platform for research into the development of next-generation warehouse computing. It gives researchers a testbed for studying how the data centers that process voice-enabled queries should evolve.

Protean Code Allows Data Center Servers to Adapt to Changing Environments with Breakthrough Compiler Technology

Protean Code is an enabling technology for dynamically recompiling native applications and rebalancing the use of Warehouse Scale Computers resources as demands dictate.

Prof. Igor Markov's book on VLSI Physical Design Translated into Chinese

The book introduces and evaluates algorithms used during physical design to produce a geometric chip layout from an abstract circuit design, and presents the essential and fundamental algorithms used within each physical design stage.

Satish Narayanasamy Receives Google Faculty Research Award

His research focus is on addressing concurrency issues in mobile and cloud systems, which increasingly rely upon event-driven programming and customized processor accelerators.

Wakefield and Kieras win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

The paper addresses how to manage multiple sources so that the user can maximize the information gained from each acoustic source.

Leaders in ultra low power cicuits and systems presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

All of the research being presented focuses on getting the absolute best performance from the tiniest circuits, sensors, and electronic devices.

Researchers funded to develop a leap forward in Processor Architectures

The project proposes to produce a parallel heterogeneous 3D near-threshold computing system with unprecedented energy efficiency.

U-M researcher involved in $10 million project to advance computer programming

The five year project includes multiple research institutions, partners in industry, and educational outreach to the next generation of computer scientists.

Making smart dust a reality

This research is expected to have a fundamental and long term impact on a diverse set of applications ranging from energy conservation to health care.

Xi Chen and Prof. Robert Dick receive DATE Best Paper Award

The authors analyzed performance and accuracy for a variety of dynamic thermal analysis techniques and used their findings to develop a new analysis technique. Congratulations!

Paving the way for ubiquitous computing

Until now, ubiquitous computing has been hampered by the size of necessary batteries—but Ambiq Micro is changing that, with their energy-efficient micro-controllers.

EECS Researchers win Best Paper Award at ICCAD 2010

Their paper introduces new techniques that improve speed, solution quality, simplicity, and integration with other optimizations for global placement technology.

Zhengya Zhang earns Best Paper Award at Symposium on VLSI Circuits

The resulting 65nm CMOS test chip achieved an energy efficiency of 21 pJ/bit making it a promising candidate for low-power, high-performance applications.

Ambiq Micro: Taking a startup to the next level

“Imagine a microprocessor so tiny and long lasting that it can be implanted in the eye of a glaucoma sufferer to measure the progress of the disease.”

Millimeter-scale, energy-harvesting sensor system developed

The system could enable new biomedical implants as well as home-, building- and bridge-monitoring devices.

Prof. Karem Sakallah shares 2009 CAV Award for fundamental work on SAT solvers

The award recognizes the researchers' contributions to the development of high-performance Boolean satisfiability solvers.

EECS researchers receive Best Paper Award at ISLPED

The paper explores logic and memory circuit topologies for a new type of transistor in development at IBM.

Work in software defined radio earns Best Paper Award at MICRO-41

The winning paper describes a commercial prototype processor that targets wireless baseband processing for the next generation of cellular phones.