MICL
menu MENU
Home > News > All News > Euisik Yoon

Euisik Yoon

New machine learning method improves testing of stem-like tumor cells for breast cancer research

To improve the prediction and identification of stem-like cancer cells, Prof. Euisik Yoon’s group developed a method that is 3.5 times faster than the standard approach.

Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers

It will now be possible to study brain activity when timing is important, such as the consolidation of memory.

Enabling large-scale testing of cancer drugs with machine learning

Prof. Euisik Yoon and his team developed a new machine learning tool that enables large-scale testing of cancer drug effectiveness with microfluidics.

By Cannibalizing Nearby Stromal Stem Cells, Some Breast Cancer Cells Gain Invasion Advantage

Cancer biologists and engineers collaborated on a device that could help predict the likelihood of breast cancer metastasis.

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

Capturing cancer cells from blood samples offers a non-invasive way to observe whether the cancer is disappearing or whether it is becoming resistant to the treatment.

Solar cells enable self-powered camera

A solar cell combined with a camera sensor collects photons to provide electricity.

COMBAT team receives Ted Kennedy Family Faculty Team Excellence Award

The group brought together experts in radar and remote sensing, integrated circuits, imaging, navigation, power, communications, and nano-fabrication.

Euisik Yoon presents the 2017 LNF User Symposium keynote address

The keynote was titled, “Biointerface Technologies: Where Engineering Meets Science and Medicine.”

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists.

‘Sister cell’ profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

Michigan engineers release individual cells from a specially-designed chip using laser pulses.

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

It Takes the Best to Serve the Best.

2017 EECS Outstanding Achievement Awards

Congratulations!

The Michigan Probe: Changing the Course of Brain Research

Some believed early Michigan brain researchers were engaging in “science fiction” – until development of an advanced tool for forging breakthroughs proved them wrong.

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new tool for making sense of the cells believed to cause cancer relapses and metastases.

Students seek the secrets of the brain in study abroad program

IPAN sent eight undergraduates to Germany for a month of lab work, learning about the intricacies of the brain.

Leaders in neuroscience look to the future

ICAN bring engineers and neuroscientists together to review the recent advancement in neurotechnology and neuroscience, define the need for next-generation tools, and enhance the translation of technology to the scientific community.

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program will bring together researchers from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain.

Mapping the brain: probes with tiny LEDs shed light on neural pathways

The new probes can control and record the activity of many individual neurons, and are believed to be the smallest implantable LEDs ever made.

$5M for international neurotechnology “dream team”

A “dream team” of experts in sensors, electronics, data analysis and neuroscience has been awarded a $5 million grant to help unravel the mysteries of the brain and cross-train a group of internationally-connected neuroscientists and engineers.

Mapping the brain with lasers

Yoon is leading a team that will design new light sources with lasers capable of zooming in on individual neuron circuits within the brain.

Biochips for better cancer therapy

One promising area of cancer treatment is photodynamic therapy, which combines the agents of a photosensitive drug, light, and oxygen.

MCubed A Year Later: A record of fostering innovative research

Several of the cubes enabled research to progress to the point that faculty are applying for larger grants to continue the work.

Neural Probe Research recognized with Best Paper Award at 2013 Transducers Conference

“We present a novel strategy to scale up the number of electrodes with minimized risk.”

ECE faculty are MCubing to find answers – fast

The goal of MCubed is to jumpstart novel, high-risk and transformative research projects.

Super-fine sound beam could one day be an invisible scalpel

“We believe this could be used as an invisible knife for noninvasive surgery,” Guo said. “Nothing pokes into your body, just the ultrasound beam.”

A minimally-invasive brain implant to translate thoughts into movement

The implant is called the BioBolt, and unlike other neural interface technologies that establish a connection from the brain to an external device such as a computer, it’s minimally invasive and low power.